Nursing diagnosis – RISK FOR DYSFUNCTIONAL GASTROINTESTINAL MOTILITY

RISK  FOR  DYSFUNCTIONAL

GASTROINTESTINAL  MOTILITY

DEFINITION

Risk for increased, decreased, ineffective, or lack of peristaltic activity

within the gastrointestinal system

RISK FACTORS

• Abdominal surgery

• Gastroesophageal reflux

• Diabetes

disease (GERD)

• Prematurity

• Unsanitary food preparation

• Decreased gastrointestinal

• Anxiety

circulation

• Lifestyle

• Pharmaceutical agents (e.g.,

• Immobility

narcotics, antibiotics, proton
pump inhibitors, and laxatives)

• Food intolerance (e.g., gluten,
lactose)

ASSESSMENT FOCUS    (Refer  to  comprehensive  assessment  parameters.)

• Nutrition

• Fluid and electrolytes

• Elimination

• Physical regulation

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

The patient will

• Maintain adequate fluid and electrolyte balance.

• Identify diet selections and lifestyle changes that would promote

healthy GI function.

• Not experience altered GI motility related to prescribed

medications.

• Recognize chronic conditions that may contribute to altered GI

motility, for example, diabetes, GERD.

SUGGESTED NOC OUTCOMES

Electrolyte and Acid–Base Balance; Fluid Balance; Bowel Elimination

INTERVENTIONS AND RATIONALES

Determine: Assess patient for signs of fluid or electrolyte imbalance

related to increased or decreased GI motility. Fluid and electrolyte

alterations can result from either increased or decreased

gastrointestinal motility.

Assess patient for positive risk factors for altered GI motility. This

will allow for timely interventions to prevent complications associ-

ated with GI dysfunction.

Perform: Assist patients taking prescribed medications that affect

motility with strategies to avoid GI complications. Awareness of pre-

ventive measures will decrease GI complications.

Encourage early ambulation for postoperative patients receiving

opioids for pain control. Early ambulation will reduce the risk of

narcotic-related constipation.

Inform: Educate patient regarding the risk factors related to altered

GI motility, including certain food choices, fluid intake, medications,

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and activity. Promotion of healthy lifestyle choices will contribute to

positive patient outcomes.

Attend: Provide encouragement and support for behaviors that

enhance gastrointestinal health. Positive reinforcement results in

improved confidence in self-management of health behaviors.

Manage: Coordinate care with other disciplines as needed to

reinforce positive behaviors or to assist with complex situations.

SUGGESTED NIC INTERVENTIONS

Diarrhea Management; Electrolyte Monitoring; Fluid Management;

Nutrition Management

Reference

Mazumdar, A., Mishra, S., Bhatnagar, S., & Gupta, D. (2008). Intravenous

morphine can avoid distressing constipation associated with oral morphine:
A retrospective analysis of our experience in 11 patients in the palliative
care in-patient unit. The American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care,
25, 282–284.

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