Nursing diagnosis – READINESS FOR ENHANCED ORGANIZED INFANT BEHAVIOR

READINESS  FOR  ENHANCED  ORGANIZED

INFANT  BEHAVIOR

DEFINITION

A pattern of modulation of the physiologic and behavioral systems

of functioning (such as autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-

regulatory, and attentional–interactional systems) in an infant that is

satisfactory but that can be improved

DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS

• Use of some self-regulatory behaviors

• Definite sleep–wake states

• Responsiveness to visual and auditory stimuli

• Stable physiologic measures

RELATED FACTORS

• Pain

• Immaturity

ASSESSMENT FOCUS    (Refer  to  comprehensive  assessment  parameters.)

• Elimination

• Role/relationships

• Neurocognition

• Sensation/perception

• Nutrition

• Sleep/rest

• Physical regulation

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

The parents will

• Express understanding of their role in infant’s behavioral develop-

ment.

• Express confidence in their ability to interpret infant’s behavioral

cues.

• Identify means to promote infant’s behavioral development.

• Express positive feelings about their ability to care for infant.

• Identify resources for help with infant.

The infant will

• Maintain physiologic stability.

• Maintain an organized motor system.

• Respond to information in an adaptive way.

SUGGESTED NOC OUTCOMES

Knowledge: Child Development: 1, 2, 4, 6, and 12 Months; Infant

Care; Neurological Status; Sleep

INTERVENTIONS AND RATIONALES

Determine: Monitor infant’s responses to ensure effectiveness of

preventive measures.

Perform: Demonstrate appropriate ways of interacting with the

infant, such as moderate stimulation, gentle rocking, and quiet

vocalizations, to help the parents identify the most effective methods

of interacting with their child.

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Inform: Explain to parents that infant maturation is a developmental

process. Further explain that infants exhibit three behavioral states:

sleeping, crying, and being awake and alert. Also explain that

infants provide behavioral cues that indicate their needs. Education

will help parents understand the importance of nurturing the infant

and prepare them to respond to the infant’s behavioral cues.

Explain to parents that their actions can help promote infant

development. Make it clear, however, that infant maturation isn’t

completely within their control. Explanation may decrease feelings

of anxiety and incompetence and help prevent unrealistic

expectations.

Help parents interpret behavioral cues from their infant to foster

healthy parent–child interaction. For example, help them recognize

when the infant is awake and alert, and point out to them that this

is a good time to provide stimulation.

Help parents identify ways they can promote the infant’s develop-

ment, such as providing stimulation by shaking a rattle in front of

the infant, talking to the infant in a gentle voice, and looking at the

infant when feeding him. This encourages practices that promote the

infant’s development. Sensory experiences promote cognitive devel-

opment.

Attend: Explore with parents ways to cope with stress caused by the

infant’s behavior to increase their coping skills.

Praise parents for their attempts to enhance their interaction with

the infant to provide positive reinforcement.

Manage: Provide parents with information on sources of support

and special infant services to encourage them to continue to foster

their infant’s development.

SUGGESTED NIC INTERVENTIONS

Attachment Promotion; Developmental Care; Environmental

Management: Attachment Process; Family Integrity Promotion:

Childbearing Family; Infant Care; Sleep Enhancement

Reference

Byers, J. F., et al. (2006, January–February). A quasi-experimental trial on

individualized, developmentally supportive family-centered care. Journal of
Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 35(1), 105–115.

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